Barsawing

Bar saws, also known as chain saws, operate on the same principle as a wood chain saw but utilising a diamond encrusted chain.
A1 Kiwi have both petrol and hydraulic powered bar saws that are able to cut to a depth of 500mm.

The bar saw can be used to cut perfect corners without over-cuts on openings as small as 150mm x 150mm, making it a preferred option of Engineers as it does not compromise the structural integrity.

Electric Floorsaw

Our 3-Phase electric saw is capable of a maximum cutting depth of 265mm. This machine is used for interior situations where internal combustion engines cannot be used due to the carbon monoxide emissions.

General locations where this electric saw is normally used are shopping malls, supermarkets, hospitals, offices, banks, airports and warehouses. In these situations it is the perfect tool for efficiently cutting for a variety of requirements such as new floor ducting, drainage, loading bay constructions and internal building foundations.

Floorsawing

A1 Kiwi's concrete floor sawing can be carried out with a variety of machines powered by diesel, petrol or 3 phase electric.
These machines are used to cut reinforced concrete or tarseal/asphalt to ease the removal of redundant material or to form expansion joints in new slabs. The benefit of A1 Kiwi's floor sawing methods are that they leave the remaining floor slab undisturbed. This in turn gives our clients a clean cut line to continue with their required activities.

A1 Kiwi's floor sawing service offers a maximum cutting depth of 500mm into reinforced concrete or tarseal/asphalt.

Flushcutting

The primary benefit of the flush-cut hand saw is its ability to cut close to walls and floors to reduce the need for further breaking out in tight situations. This is a distinct advantage in both time and money, specifically as it reduces the need for making-good.
A1 Kiwi have both petrol and hydraulic powered flush-cut hand saws and can achieve depths of both 150mm and 200mm.

Handsawing

Hand sawing is very versatile and can be used in nearly every situation where cuts are required.
A1 Kiwi's operators are highly skilled and equipped with petrol, hydraulic and electric powered hand saws. Petrol and hydraulic powered hand saws have a maximum cutting depth of 150mm while electrically powered hand saws have a maximum cutting depth of 130mm.

  • Formation of new doorway and window openings
  • Expansion cuts in new slabs
  • Demolition cutting to walls and floors
  • Penetrations for service ducts
  • Chasing for electrical and plumbing services

Ring-sawing

A1 Kiwi's ring sawing solution can be used to cut a variety of reinforced concrete walls, block walls and floors.
Our ring saws have a maximum cutting depth of 265mm and are a hand-held tool. The saws are powered either by a petrol engine or petrol/three phase hydraulic power packs which gives it the flexibility to be used inside safely without the risk of poisonous fumes you can get with a conventional petrol engine.

A1 Kiwi's ring saws are predominantly used to cut out doorways and windows through reinforced concrete and brick/block walls. These machines are extremely versatile and can be used in confined spaces. Our ring saw process is low-noise and vibration-free, and because A1 Kiwi operates this as a wet process, it is virtually dust free & causes minimal disruption to others.
Ideal for:

  • Cutting concrete pipes and risers
  • Cutting windows and doorways in the structural fabric of buildings
  • Creating openings in reinforced concrete floors where access is restricted
  • Removal of existing overhangs and soffits
  • Demolition cutting

Soffcutting

Early Entry Cutting / Soff Cutting, as it's predominately known is a technology which enables concrete to be cut within 1 to 2 hours after placing and floating to reduce cracking.

The benefits of this form of cutting, in completing the expansion cuts earlier, are:

  • The opportunity to save 12 - 36 hours in the construction timeline thereby saving costs
  • The provision of higher quality foundation slabs by controlling shrinkage cracks earlier in the concrete curing process